Wednesday, 28 May 2014

Multiple Sclerosis World Day

World MS Day (WMSD) has been established by the Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (MSIF) and its member MS societies for any individual, group or organisation to work together to raise awareness of MS. World MS Day is the only global awareness raising campaign for MS. Every year, the MS movement comes together to provide the public with information about MS and to raise awareness on how it affects the lives of more than two million people around the world. Since its inception in 2009, World MS Day has grown from strength to strength, reaching hundreds of thousands of people in more than 67 countries worldwide and continuing to grow every year.
This year we are asking people to imagine a world without barriers.(...) When we talk about equality of access for people with MS we mean access to social, political and economic life. Equality of access doesn’t just mean physical access to buildings, but access to the same tools, services and facilities that people who do not have MS enjoy. (literally via)



Multiple sclerosis is mostly diagnosed between the age of 20 and 40 (Palace, 2001). In other words, within "the" range people work. When it affects job performance, little changes in the workplace environment can make big differences. These could be modification of work schedule (e.g. flexible work hours, shift change, work from home), modification of job tasks (e.g. job sharing, reassignment of tasks to another position, modification of the regular job), modification of workstation (relocating workstation closer to washroom, installing a ramp, special equipment, designated parking space), changes in workplace policies, transfer to or training for another position in the organisation (Roberts, 2006).

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- Palace, J. (2001) Making the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, 71
- Roberts, A. (2006) MS in the Workplace: An employer's guide. MS Society of Canada (edited by Pestrak, N.)

7 comments:

  1. Thanks for the pointer.

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  2. Big thanks for your - highly appreciated - comments, Derek, Erin, Sam, Wim, Frans and Abbie!

    ReplyDelete